Forest ThreatNet

Volume 10, Issue 5 - Nov. / Dec. 2016

Native American Research Assistantship Program Provides "Unforgettable" Experience

A female Mexican spotted owl is mid-air between Elisha Flores and Chase VoirinAs 2016 field season participants in the Native American Research Assistantship Program (RAP) provided by the Forest Service and The Wildlife Society, Chase Voirin and Elisha Flores often hiked in remote areas to locate, monitor, and assess any changes in occupancy and reproduction of Mexican spotted owl breeding pairs. Eastern Threat Center biological scientist Serra Hoagland, a co-point of contact for tribal relations for the Southern Research Station, developed and coordinated their work--one of 13 unique research projects providing assistantship opportunities to Native American students since the RAP’s inception in 2015. "The amount of support I received while being involved with this program was more than I could have asked for, and the new experiences I gained exceeded my expectations. This program helped me feel more prepared and opened my eyes to so many possibilities. This was a summer I will never forget,” says Flores. Read more in the Forest Service Office of Tribal Relations newsletter...

Pictured: A female Mexican spotted owl (Strix occidentalis lucida) is mid-air between Elisha Flores (left) and Chase Voirin (right) on the Mescalero Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico. Photo by Serra Hoagland, U.S. Forest Service.

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